Sunday, September 4, 2016

More Year-long Hot Streaks

Since the original post has gotten a relatively decent amount of traffic, and since I've uncovered a few more year-long streaks (and probably forgotten quite a few) since I wrote it four years ago, I thought I'd post a quick follow up.

Wade Boggs and Tony Gwynn always seemed like legitimate threats to hit .400 (Gwynn might have actually done it if not for the '94 strike), so it makes sense that both players accomplished the feat over the course of 365-day periods:

Wade Boggs (June 9, 1985 to June 6, 1986)


GABRH2B3BHRRBIBBSOSBBAOBPSLGOPS
1626411252575021292109531.401.489.5411.031

Tony Gwynn (July 3, 1993 to July 2, 1994)


GABRH2B3BHRRBIBBSOSBBAOBPSLGOPS
130508100204452148049199.402.451.5811.032

Boggs and Gwynn are deservedly in the Hall of Fame. Another phenomenal hitter and all-around great player who should be in the Hall of Fame, Larry Walker also flirted with .400 on occasion. Unlike Boggs or Gwynn, Walker was a power hitter. Not a natural .340-hitter like those other two, his numbers were boosted by playing his home games at Coors Field in the late 90s. But oh, the numbers he put up...

Larry Walker (July 19, 1998 to July 18, 1999)


GABRH2B3BHRRBIBBSOSBBAOBPSLGOPS
12946213118531539111566815.400.472.7421.214

And finally, Mark McGwire's 1999 campaign overall was a slight fall-off from his spectacular 1998 season. After a slow start, Big Mac was hitting .225 with 8 homeruns on May 19th. But from that point on he was better than ever, going on an unprecedented rampage that really only subsided when injuries slowed him down in 2000.

Mark McGwire (May 19, 1999 to May 18, 2000)


GABRH2B3BHRRBIBBSOSBBAOBPSLGOPS
147494124149191741591361360.302.449.7941.243

For this 365-day period, McGwire had more RBI than hits, and almost half of his 149 hits (and .302 batting average!) were homers. He finally spent an extended stint on the DL in July and August, and retired following a disappointing 2001 season.

2 comments:

  1. Boggs and Gwynn are deservedly in the Hall of Fame. Another phenomenal hitter and all-around great player who should be in the Hall of Fame, "Larry Walker also flirted with .400 on occasion. Unlike Boggs or Gwynn, Walker was a power hitter. Not a natural .340-hitter like those other two, his numbers were boosted by playing his home games at Coors Field in the late 90s. But oh, the numbers he put up..."

    Speaking of which, are you aware of any study that shows what Walker would have hit had he spent his career in a neutral park?

    Most of the discussion of his HOF case seems to be consist of grousing that anyone would ask such as stupid question or 'Walker is all Coors, have you looked at his road numbers???' with little in between of rational analysis.

    Thanks in advance for any reply. Cheers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, his OPS+ (which adjusts for league and park context) is 141, which is tied for 69th all-time, tied with (among others) Ryan Braun, Chipper Jones, and David Ortiz. He's ahead of guys like A-Rod, Sheffield, Giambi, Reggie Jackson, Ken Griffey Jr., George Brett....
      Basically, he's one of the top 100 hitters of all time, and that's not to mention his superb defense and baserunning.

      http://www.baseball-reference.com/leaders/onbase_plus_slugging_plus_career.shtml

      Delete